CHRONIC CONDITIONS

There are many lifelong, chronic conditions that are suitable for rehabilitation. Have a read about the two most commons ones we see – hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia.

HIP DYSPLASIA

Hip Dysplasia is a common orthopaedic problem in dogs where the hip joint has not developed properly. Hip dysplasia can be common in Labradors, Bulldogs, Rottweilers, Groodles, Golden Retrievers and particularly large breed dogs. The hip is a ball and socket joint in the dog but sometimes the ball (head of the femur bone) doesn’t fit well in the socket (acetabulum of the pelvis). A well-aligned nicely fitting hip joint is essential for optimal, pain free function.

Conversely dogs with hip dysplasia can have hind limb lameness, abnormal joint wear and the development of arthritis, sometimes early in life, due to the misalignment.

Hip dysplasia can be diagnosed at an early age. There are surgical options for puppies to realign their hips or in adult dogs hip replacements can be necessary to prevent the further development of painful arthritis.

The spectrum of lameness and problems in dogs with hip dysplasia is wide. Some dogs are terribly affected, others mildly so. Many dogs are best treated medically and some surgically. If you suspect hip dysplasia, early diagnosis and treatment plans are best!

Weight management, medication, nutritional joint supplementation and injections to build good joint health can all help patients with hip dysplasia. Our Rehabilitation team will tailor a treatment plan with those treatments deemed most suitable for your dog.

Rehabilitation really helps to alleviate the clinical signs and offer better quality of life for those dogs with hip dysplasia and those who have progressed to the development of osteoarthritis. Our focus in rehabilitation of patients with hip dysplasia is on building up the muscle support around the hip joint, improving strength, stability and reducing pain. Laser therapy, massage, acupuncture/TENS, exercise programs and underwater treadmill can all help without surgery.

Where surgery is performed for hip dysplasia, our Rehabiliation team optimise the post-surgery recovery as they work closely with the orthopaedic surgeons. Rehabiliation helps hip dysplasia patients control pain, repair joint surfaces and regain hip function and range of motion. Maintaining or achieving a healthy weight is also critical as the less weight the patient carries the less pressure there is on the joint.

If your dog shows any sign of lameness, it is important to seek veterinary advice. Our team of experienced Veterinarians and Rehabilitation Therapists will be able to make a diagnosis and achieve the best treatment plan for your dog to get them on the road to reduced pain and better function.

HIP DYSPLASIA

Hip Dysplasia is a common orthopaedic problem in dogs where the hip joint has not developed properly. Hip dysplasia can be common in Labradors, Bulldogs, Rottweilers, Groodles, Golden Retrievers and particularly large breed dogs. The hip is a ball and socket joint in the dog but sometimes the ball (head of the femur bone) doesn’t fit well in the socket (acetabulum of the pelvis). A well-aligned nicely fitting hip joint is essential for optimal, pain free function.

Conversely dogs with hip dysplasia can have hind limb lameness, abnormal joint wear and the development of arthritis, sometimes early in life, due to the misalignment.

Hip dysplasia can be diagnosed at an early age. There are surgical options for puppies to realign their hips or in adult dogs hip replacements can be necessary to prevent the further development of painful arthritis.

The spectrum of lameness and problems in dogs with hip dysplasia is wide. Some dogs are terribly affected, others mildly so. Many dogs are best treated medically and some surgically. If you suspect hip dysplasia, early diagnosis and treatment plans are best!

Weight management, medication, nutritional joint supplementation and injections to build good joint health can all help patients with hip dysplasia. Our Rehabilitation team will tailor a treatment plan with those treatments deemed most suitable for your dog.

Rehabilitation really helps to alleviate the clinical signs and offer better quality of life for those dogs with hip dysplasia and those who have progressed to the development of osteoarthritis. Our focus in rehabilitation of patients with hip dysplasia is on building up the muscle support around the hip joint, improving strength, stability and reducing pain. Laser therapy, massage, acupuncture/TENS, exercise programs and underwater treadmill can all help without surgery.

Where surgery is performed for hip dysplasia, our Rehabiliation team optimise the post-surgery recovery as they work closely with the orthopaedic surgeons. Rehabiliation helps hip dysplasia patients control pain, repair joint surfaces and regain hip function and range of motion. Maintaining or achieving a healthy weight is also critical as the less weight the patient carries the less pressure there is on the joint.

If your dog shows any sign of lameness, it is important to seek veterinary advice. Our team of experienced Veterinarians and Rehabilitation Therapists will be able to make a diagnosis and achieve the best treatment plan for your dog to get them on the road to reduced pain and better function.

ELBOW DYSPLASIA

Elbow dysplasia is most common in young dogs, particularly medium to large breeds including Labradors, Rottweilers, Wolf Hounds and Bull Mastiffs. We can however see forelimb lameness in any breed of dog due to elbow dysplasia. Its sometimes one elbow effected but often can be a bilateral condition.

Patients with elbow dysplasia might appear stiff when rising on their front leg(s). Often being young and exuberant they will still want to play and run around and in the early stages of elbow dysplasia, the changes in the joint may be minimal. This makes the signs of elbow dysplasia subtle and tough to notice for owners. The problem is that left untreated, or treated with short courses of anti-inflammatories, debilitating arthritis can develop for those patients in which elbow dysplasia has gone undiagnosed and treated.

Arthritis in the elbow joint is unfortunately a natural progression for dogs with elbow dysplasia. This can come much later in life however it can sadly also result in debilitating arthritis in puppies less than 12 months old. This is why early diagnosis and a tailored rehabilitation program is so important.

To determine if your puppy or adult dog has elbow dysplasia our vets will conducts a thorough clinical examination checking for signs such as joint swelling, pain or reduced range of motion in the elbow joint. High quality x-rays are usually the key to diagnosing elbow dysplasia. Sometimes CT or arthroscopy is helpful too.

Sometimes there can be a loose or damaged fragment of cartilage in the joint which can be removed by arthroscopy. This is the cornerstone to management of elbow dysplasia. All dogs with elbow dysplasia (with or without concurrent arthritis) benefit from rehabilitation program incorporating laser therapy, hydrotherapy, pain management and dietary additives with the team at IAR or even stem cell therapy at Illawarra Animal Hospital.

ELBOW DYSPLASIA

Elbow dysplasia is most common in young dogs, particularly medium to large breeds including Labradors, Rottweilers, Wolf Hounds and Bull Mastiffs. We can however see forelimb lameness in any breed of dog due to elbow dysplasia. Its sometimes one elbow effected but often can be a bilateral condition.

Patients with elbow dysplasia might appear stiff when rising on their front leg(s). Often being young and exuberant they will still want to play and run around and in the early stages of elbow dysplasia, the changes in the joint may be minimal. This makes the signs of elbow dysplasia subtle and tough to notice for owners. The problem is that left untreated, or treated with short courses of anti-inflammatories, debilitating arthritis can develop for those patients in which elbow dysplasia has gone undiagnosed and treated.

Arthritis in the elbow joint is unfortunately a natural progression for dogs with elbow dysplasia. This can come much later in life however it can sadly also result in debilitating arthritis in puppies less than 12 months old. This is why early diagnosis and a tailored rehabilitation program is so important.

To determine if your puppy or adult dog has elbow dysplasia our vets will conducts a thorough clinical examination checking for signs such as joint swelling, pain or reduced range of motion in the elbow joint. High quality x-rays are usually the key to diagnosing elbow dysplasia. Sometimes CT or arthroscopy is helpful too.

Sometimes there can be a loose or damaged fragment of cartilage in the joint which can be removed by arthroscopy. This is the cornerstone to management of elbow dysplasia. All dogs with elbow dysplasia (with or without concurrent arthritis) benefit from rehabilitation program incorporating laser therapy, hydrotherapy, pain management and dietary additives with the team at IAR or even stem cell therapy at Illawarra Animal Hospital.

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GET IN TOUCH TODAY!
WE ARE ALWAYS HERE TO HELP.

BOOK NOW
CALL NOW
E-MAIL NOW